Dilley Landing boat launch is located on the Coast Fork of the Willamette River under the management of the ODFW at 541 726-3515. Dilley Landing is accessed by turning left onto Dilley Ln. located 1.9 miles from Exit 188B on I-5 and follow Dilley Ln. for .2 miles to the driveway for the entrance to Dilley Landing. Turn to right and follow the driveway to the boat ramp.

Row River Nature Park is located on the Row River a tributary of the Coast Fork of the Willamette River and is under the management of the City of Cottage Grove at 541-942-3340 Location: 43.789428, -123.024881. Directions: I-5 N & Exit 174, Cottage Grove, OR 97424. Depart ramp toward Airport for 0.2 mi. Turn left onto Row River Rd for 1.4 mi. Arrive at Row River Rd. Turn left into the entrance of the Row River Park boat Launch.

Dorena Lake at Dorena Dam is located on the Row River, a tributary of the Willamette River, about six miles east of Cottage Grove, Ore.

Dorena is an an earthfill structure with a concrete spillway, completed in 1949 at a cost of $14 million and since has prevented more than $3.4 billion in potential flood damages, and controls runoff from 265 square miles of drainage area. It works in coordination with Cottage Grove Dam to provide flood risk management, water quality improvement, irrigation, recreation and habitat for fish and wildlife.

Dorena recreation

Alcohol ban: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers implemented an alcohol ban at Cottage Grove and Dorena lakes to improve recreation quality, public and employee safety, and resource allocation and protection.

Birding: With more than 2,400 acres, the Dorena Lake project provides habitat for a variety of wildlife and plants. The reservoir is a designated stop along the Big River Loop of the Willamette Valley Birding Trail, a self-guided driving tour that includes 138 birding hot-spots. Visitors can see rare birds like the purple martin, the willow flycatcher and the yellow-breasted chat near Dorena Lake. Osprey and purple martins nest in structures maintained by the Corps.

Day-use parks: Dorena Lake has two day-use parks operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Both parks have no associated fees and are open year-round from dawn to dusk. Bake Stewart Park is located at the southeast end of the lake where the Row River enters the reservoir. It is a minimally developed day use area with trails, bike racks, vault toilets, and picnic tables.  A gravel trail connects the park to the paved Row River Trail managed by Bureau of Land Management. Harms Park is a minimally developed day-use area which includes a boat ramp, paved parking area, vault toilet, picnic tables and access to the Row River Trail. There is no fee for use of the boat ramp, but ramp access is limited by seasonal water levels. For more information, call the Willamette Valley Project Park Ranger Office at 541-942-5631.

Camping: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates Schwarz Campground at Dorena Lake. To make reservations, call the National Reservation Service at 1-877-444-6777 or go to www.recreation.gov.

Schwarz Campground: Open April 27 - Sept. 10. It has 82 campsites, paved roads, flush toilets, showers, dump station, campfire rings, picnic tables, gate attendants and children's play area (no hookups). Fees: $20 per night, per site; $6 per day, per extra vehicle; $40 for double sites. Additionally, Schwarz has six group campsites. Fees: $150 per night; up to 25 vehicles per group at any one time, up to 15 of which can be camper units. Schwarz also has a life jacket loaner station available.

Baker Bay Park is operated by Lane County Parks. Call the Lane County Parks Department at call 541-682-2000 (located in Eugene). The Baker Bay concessionaire may be reached at 541-942-7669. Baker Bay also has a life jacket loaner station available.

Hiking: The Row River Trail offers more than five miles of the Row River Trail bordering Dorena Lake, and is open to hiking, biking and horseback riding. The trail can be accessed near the lake at Dorena Dam, Row Point and Harms Park trailheads. The trail begins in Cottage Grove and continues for 14 miles, with several trailheads providing multiple opportunities for short trips and shuttling options. For more information, call the Bureau of Land Management at 541-683-6600.

Cottage Grove Reservoir

Camping: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates all parks at Cottage Grove Lake. To make reservations, call the National Reservation Service at 1-877-444-6777 or go to the Pine Meadows campgrounds' website.

Pine Meadows developed campground: Open May 18 - Sept. 10 (last night to camp is 9/9). It has 85 campsites, paved roads, flush toilets, showers, dump station, campfire rings, picnic tables, gate attendants, children's play area and a marked but unsupervised swim area (no hookups) with a life jacket loaner stationFees: $22 per night per site; $6 per day, per extra vehicle.

Pine Meadows primitive campground: Open: May 25 - Sept. 3 (last night to camp is 9/2). This is a minimally-developed campground with 15 individual campsites, vault toilets, drinking water, gravel roads, picnic tables, fire rings, no hookups and no showers (primitive sites are reserved as Pine Meadows Campground sites A-O). Fees: $14 per night, per site; $6 per day, per extra vehicle.

Day-use parks: Cottage Grove Lake has four day-use only parks, three on the lakeshore and one on the river immediately below the dam. All are open May 11-Sept. 9, and are closed daily from dusk until 8:00 a.m. There is no fee for day-use areas and there are no group picnic areas or shelters available for reservations. For more information, call the Willamette Valley Project Park Ranger Office at (541) 942-5631.

Lakeside Park: Located on London Road just past the dam, Lakeside Park has paved roads and parking lots, flush toilets, picnic tables and fire rings. There is a boat launch ramp with a courtesy dock located near the entrance to the park. The boat ramp is open year-round and has a life jacket loaner station.

Riverside Park: On the east bank of the river, downstream from the dam, Riverside Park is a minimally developed area with a gravel road and parking area, two picnic tables and a vault toilet. A paved path with pull-outs suitable for wheelchairs is close enough to the river for fishing. No drinking water is available.

Wilson Creek Park: On Reservoir Road at the southwest end of the lake, Wilson Creek Park has paved roads and parking lots, flush toilets, picnic tables, fire rings, a children's play area and an unsupervised swim area with a life jacket loaner station. A boat launch ramp with a courtesy dock is near the park's entrance and is open on a seasonal basis.

Cottage Grove Reservoir: SNW - Lakeside Park boat ramp is a no use fee boat ramp operated by the Army Corp of Engineers.

Birding: The reservoir is a designated stop along the Big River Loop of the Willamette Valley Birding Trail.  This trail is a self-guided driving tour that includes 138 birding hotspots. Visitors can see rare birds like the purple martin, the willow flycatcher and the yellow-breasted chat near Cottage Grove Lake. Osprey and purple martins nest in structures maintained by the Corps.

Alcohol ban: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers implemented an alcohol ban at Cottage Grove and Dorena lakes to improve recreation quality, public and employee safety, and resource allocation and protection.

The Leave No Trace Seven Principles

The Leave No Trace Seven Principles are the bedrock of the Leave No Trace program. They provide guidance to enjoy our natural world in a sustainable way that avoids human-created impacts. The principles have been adapted so they can be applied in your backyard or your backcountry.

Note: click any of the headers below for a much deeper explanation on each principle.

Plan Ahead and Prepare

  • Know the regulations and special concerns for the area you'll visit.
  • Prepare for extreme weather, hazards, and emergencies.
  • Schedule your trip to avoid times of high use.
  • Visit in small groups when possible. Consider splitting larger groups into smaller groups.
  • Repackage food to minimize waste.
  • Use a map and compass to eliminate the use of marking paint, rock cairns or flagging. 

Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces

  • Durable surfaces include established trails and campsites, rock, gravel, dry grasses or snow.
  • Protect riparian areas by camping at least 200 feet from lakes and streams.
  • Good campsites are found, not made. Altering a site is not necessary.
    • In popular areas:
      • Concentrate use on existing trails and campsites.
      • Walk single file in the middle of the trail, even when wet or muddy.
      • Keep campsites small. Focus activity in areas where vegetation is absent.
      • In pristine areas:
      • Disperse use to prevent the creation of campsites and trails.
      • Avoid places where impacts are just beginning. 

Dispose of Waste Properly

  • Pack it in, pack it out. Inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food and litter.
  • Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep, at least 200 feet from water, camp and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished.
  • Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products.
  • To wash yourself or your dishes, carry water 200 feet away from streams or lakes and use small amounts of biodegradable soap. Scatter strained dishwater. 

Leave What You Find

  • Preserve the past: examine, but do not touch cultural or historic structures and artifacts.
  • Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them.
  • Avoid introducing or transporting non-native species.
  • Do not build structures, furniture, or dig trenches. 

Minimize Campfire Impacts

  • Campfires can cause lasting impacts to the environment. Use a lightweight stove for cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light.
  • Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings, fire pans, or mound fires.
  • Keep fires small. Only use sticks from the ground that can be broken by hand.
  • Burn all wood and coals to ash, put out campfires completely, then scatter cool ashes. 

Respect Wildlife

  • Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them.
  • Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and exposes them to predators and other dangers.
  • Protect wildlife and your food by storing rations and trash securely.
  • Control pets at all times, or leave them at home.
  • Avoid wildlife during sensitive times: mating, nesting, raising young, or winter. 

Be Considerate of Other Visitors

  • Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience.
  • Be courteous. Yield to other users on the trail.
  • Step to the downhill side of the trail when encountering pack stock.
  • Take breaks and camp away from trails and other visitors.
  • Let nature's sounds prevail. Avoid loud voices and noises. 

Visit our Homepage to learn more about Leave No Trace program.

Willamette River Middle Fork State Parks Master Plan

Willamette River Greenway Inventory

Your right to use the waterways. from the Surface, Bed and Banks of Oregon’s Rivers and Lakes. Before you use Oregon’s waterways and the land underlying and adjacent to them, you should be aware of some important legal considerations.

Southern Willamette Valley State Parks

Southern Willamette Valley State Parks and Amenities

The 14-mile-long Fall Creek National Recreation Trail The Fall Creek Trail is designated as a National Recreation Trail. As a Hiker Only route, it follows Fall Creek for most of the route, allowing the hiker to enjoy the cool valley air and observing the mix of riparian (streamside) vegetation. Just east of Bedrock Campground, the trail climbs up slope around a parcel of private land and then descends to Fall Creek.

Oregon Fly Fishing for Trout

Willamette Valley Birding Trail Guide The complete guide to the Willamette Valley Birding Trail is available here in a series of Adobe Acrobat (pdf) downloads. To view these you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer (a free download can be obtained from Adobe's Website ). Some of these files are large so approximate download times are given (based on a 56k modem). You can choose from the list of downloads below or click on an area of the trail map to view the section of the guide for that portion of the trail. Note that a revision of this guide is planned prior to printing in late July 2009. Please send any comments or corrections to the project coordinator. A list of errata will be maintained during this period; click here to download the most recent version. Join the Coast Fork Birders for a spring bird walk at Cottage Grove Lake.

Alton Baker Park in Eugene is accessed from Exit 194B on I-5. Go west toward Eugene to North Garden Way. Turn left onto North Garden Way to Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. Road name changes to W Centennial Blvd. Continue to Aspen St. Turn right onto Aspen St to the boat ramp located at the end of Aspen St.

Dilley Landing boat launch is located on the Coast Fork of the Willamette River under the management of the ODFW at 541 726-3515. Dilley Landing is accessed by turning left onto Dilley Ln. located 1.9 miles from Exit 188B on I-5 and follow Dilley Ln. for .2 miles to the driveway for the entrance to Dilley Landing. Turn to right and follow the driveway to the boat ramp.

Island Park boat landing on the Willamette River is operated by Willamalane Park District at 541-736-4104. Island Park is accessed by exiting I-5 at Exit 194. Travel to the east on Hwy's 126 and 58 for .8 miles staying in the right lane take exit Hwy 58 S. for .4 of a mile and turn right onto Pioneer Pkwy W for 1.0 miles. Turn right onto Main St. Travel to the next street, Mill St. and turn right to the Island Park boat launch.

Clearwater Park boat landing on the Willamette River is operated by Willamalane Park District at 541-736-4104. Exit I-5 onto exit 194 A or B. east on 126 E for 3.5 miles. Take ramp right for 42nd St. toward Jasper / Springfield. Turn right onto 42nd St. Road name changes to S 42nd St. At roundabout, take 3rd exit onto Jasper Rd. Turn right onto Clearwater Ln. Travel to the boat ramp at the end of Clearwater Ln.

Jasper Bridge Access a no use fee boat launch operated by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at 800-551-6949  on the Middle Fork Willamette River. To access Jasper Bridge Access Exit I-5 onto exit 188 A or B and go east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 5.7 miles to Parkway Rd. Turn left onto Parkway Rd for 2.9 miles to Jasper Bridge Access located on the rightside of the road prior to the bridge over the Willamette River.

Jasper State Park Hand Launch is a use fee to launch boat ramp. The boat ramp is used to launch small hand launched watercraft operated by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department  at 541-937-1173 on the Middle Fork Willamette River. To access Jasper State Park Hand Launch Exit I-5 onto exit 188 A or B and go east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 5.7 miles to Parkway Rd. Turn left onto Parkway Rd for 2.2 miles to Jasper Park Dr. Turn right onto Jasper Park Dr. and go .5 miles to the hand carried boat launch parking area.

Fall Creek Lake (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985).  Fall Creek Lake, one of 13 multi-purpose water resource projects built and operated by the U. S. Corps of Engineers in the Willamette Valley, is located on a small tributary of the Middle Fork Willamette River in the rolling hill country southeast of Eugene. It became operational in 1966 and exists primarily to control downstream flooding on the Willamette River. As such, the water level fluctuates throughout the year. From spring until late summer the water level is kept high (maximum depth = 161 feet) and the lake is heavily used for recreation. Beginning in late summer and through the winter, the water level is drawn down to as much as 100 feet below full pool to provide storage for flood waters. It is then less satisfactory for recreation because of the extensive mud flats exposed around the shoreline.

Winberry Boat Ramp a use fee boat ramp on Fall Creek Lake is managed by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Contact 541-937-1173. Lake access closed Oct. 1st - April 1st. Open to boating from May 1st - Sept. 30th (water levels permitting)

North Shore Fall Creek a non use fee boat launch is managed by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at 541-937-1173. Lake access closed Oct. 1st - April 1st. Open to boating from April 1st - Sept. 30th. There are four other small, free, day-use sites on North side of the lake. North Shore has both a high water and low-water ramp, vault toilets and is open April - September. Access to Winberry Boat Ramp is exit I-5 from exit 188 to the east on Hwy 58 for 12.9 miles to Jasper/Lowell Rd. Turn left onto Jasper/Lowell Rd for 2.7 miles to Big Fall Creek Rd. Follow Big Fall Creek Rd for 1.8 miles to the North Shore Fall Creek boat launch.

Cascara Campground a non use fee boat launch is managed by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at 541-937-1173. Lake access closed Oct. 1st - April 1st. Open to boating from May 1st - Sept. 30th (water levels permitting). Exit I-5 from exit 188 to the east on Hwy 58 for 12.9 miles to Jasper/Lowell Rd. Turn left onto Jasper/Lowell Rd for 2.7 miles to Big Fall Creek Rd. Follow Big Fall Creek Rd for 1.8 miles to the North Shore Fall Creek boat launch. Drive past the North Shore boat launch and continue to Day Use Areas Lakeside 1 and Lakeside 11. the Cascara campground and boat launch at the end of the Fall Creek Arm of the lake.

Alternative Driving Directions to Lakeside I & II

  • From I-5, take Exit 194 A for Highway 126 East
  • Follow on Highway 126 for 6.6 miles to Bob Straub Parkway
  • Continue straight onto Bob Straub Parkway, then Highway 222 South and Jasper/Jasper Lowell Roads
  • Turn left onto Place Road and drive for 3.6 miles to Big Fall Creek Road
  • Continue on Big Fall Creek Road
  • Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road and follow for about 8 miles to Lakeside I on the right (head east for 0.4 miles to Lakeside II ).

Cascara campground, on the upper end of the Fall Creek Arm of the lake, is tucked away amid towering Douglas fir trees. This rustic campground offers 39 campsites, vault toilets, potable water, a launch ramp and swim area.  The first come, first served campsites are private, with many having views of the lake.  Looking for a place to camp with your group? A lake front reservable RV group camp, Fisherman's Point, is just across the road from Cascara campground.

Fisherman's Point Group Campground has Eight sites, maximum eight people per site for a total of 64 campers. The group camp has potable water and portable toilets.

And if you want to get out on the reservoir for the day, check out one of the five day-use areas. Winberry, with its two-lane boat ramp and parking for more than 100 cars and 150 boat trailers, is the largest.  It features flush restrooms, a swim dock and swim beach, and picnic areas with bbqs and fire rings.  There is a day use fee at Winberry. Exit I-5 from exit 188 to the east on Hwy 58 for 12.9 miles to Jasper/Lowell Rd. Turn left onto Jasper/Lowell Rd for 2.7 miles to Big Fall Creek Rd. Go to the right at Big Fall Creek Rd for .4 miles and right again onto Wineberry Creek Rd for 1.1 miles to the Winberry Boat Launch.

There are four other small, free, day-use sites on North side of the lake. North Shore has both a high water and low-water ramp, vault toilets and is open April - September. Free Meadow Day Use Area is a no Fee day use area located 2.8 miles east of North Shore Day Use Site open from May 1- September 30. The Day Uaw Area offers picnic sites,  boat ramp, bucket toilet. Contact 800-452-5678 for additional information. Lakeside I and Lakeside II Day Use Areas are no use fees associated with these day use areas located 0.4 miles of each other and approximately 5 miles east of North Shore Day-Use Site. The day use areas are open from May 1- September 30. The service provided includePicnic sites  boat ramp, vault toilets. Contact 800-452-5678 for additional information.

Pengra Access Williamette River Greenway is operated Oregon Parks and Recreation Department . The boat ramp is used to launch small hand launched watercraft on the Middle Fork Willamette River. At exit 188, take ramp east on OR-58 for 5.6 miles toward Klamath Falls / Oakridge. Turn left onto OR-222 / Parkway Rd for 2,9 miles to Jasper-Lowell Rd. Turn right onto Jasper-Lowell Rd. for 3.9 miles to Pengra Rd. Go stright on Pengra Rd for 1.2 miles to N Shore Dr. Turn right onto N Shore Dr. for .3 miles to the boat ramp.

Elijah Bristow State Park and hand boat launch. The Elijah Bristoe State Park is operated by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at 541-937-1173. A no use fee hand boat launch is located in the park. Exit I-5 onto exit 188 A or B. east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 9.4 miles to Wheeler Rd. Turn left onto Wheeler Rd then right into the entrance of Elijah Bristow State Park and turn right again for .9 miles to the parking area for the hank launch boat ramp.

Elijah Bristow State Park is located on the Middle Fork of the Willamette River, and is easy to reach via State Highway 58 southeast of the Eugene. The park was named for one of the first pioneer settlers in Lane County and is comprised of 847 acres of scattered meadows, woodlands and wetlands.  2 reservable group picnic areas, and numerous first come, first serve picnic sites provide plenty of opportunity relax and enjoy nature.

Middlefork Boat Launch is a no use fee boat launch managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the  Middle Fork Willamette River. Exit 188 A or B. east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 12.9. miles. Turn left at Turn left onto Jasper Lowell Rd, which becomes Pioneer St. for .7 miles. Turn left to stay on Jasper Lowell Rd / North Shore Dr. The name of the road changes to Pengra Rd. Travel on the road for approximately 1.5 to the entrance of the Middlefork Boat Launch.

Dexter Lake: The drainage basin for Dexter Lake is, of course, the same as for Lookout Point Lake; it is a forested area stretching to the crest of the Cascade Mountains. The lake itself lies in the transition zone between the mountains and the Willamette Valley, an area of gentle topography that consists of alluvial fill and old river terraces, surrounded by remnant buttes of basalt and diorite. The western hemlock and Douglas fir forests that dominate the drainage basin show great variety around the lake where there has been significant alteration of vegetation. About three-quarters of the drainage basin is managed by the Willamette National Forest. There are significant amounts of private holdings upstream around the town of Oakridge and adjacent to the lower half of Lookout Point Lake and around Dexter Lake.

Dexter State Park Dexter State Recreation Site, on the western edge of Dexter Reservoir, provides convenient access to the reservoir with docks and a two lane launch ramp.  A picnic area with bbq stands and fire rings overlooks the lake.  But the lake is not the only attraction!  A popular 18-hole disc golf course winds it way through oaks and Douglas fir trees and you can reach nearby Elijah Bristow State Park through a system of connecting trails that follow the Middle Fork of the Willamette River.

Dexter State Recreation Site is a no use fee boat launch operated by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at 541-937-1173 Dexter Reservoir. Exit 188 A or B. east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 10.8. miles. Turn to the left into the entrance of Dexter State Park and then to the right to the boat ramp.

Lowell Park sits on the North shore of Dexter Lake, next to the city of Lowell.  This day use park has it all!  A reservable picnic shelter overlooks the lake and a wooded picnic area.  A playground, basketball court, and flush restroom are all nearby.  Down by the water is a large lawn area with picnic tables and a swim beach.  For the boaters, there is a marina with rentable moorage, a large courtesy dock and a 4 lane launch ramp.

Lowell State Recreation Site is a no use fee boat launch at Dexter Reservoir managed the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department at  541-937-1173. Exit 188 A or B. east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 12.9. miles. Turn left at Turn left onto Jasper Lowell Rd, which becomes Pioneer St. for .7 miles.urn left to stay on Jasper Lowell Rd / North Shore Dr. for .8 miles to the multi lane improved boat launch.

Lookout Point Lake The lake receives heavy recreational use, especially for boating, but is poor for fishing. It is heavily infested with rough fish, suckers and squawfish. Several picnicking and boat launching facilities are located around the lake, some provided by Lane County, others by the state and the Willamette National Forest. The seasonal draw-down generally limits lake access from these sites.

Meridian Park is a no use fee boat launch operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  at Lookout Point Lake. Contact at 800-551-6949.

Exit 188 A or B. east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 12.9. miles. Turn left at Turn left onto Jasper Lowell Rd, which becomes Pioneer St. for .7 miles.urn left to stay on Jasper Lowell Rd / North Shore Dr. for .7 miles. Turn right onto E Main St. for 400 feet. Turn right onto North Shore Ln / W Boundary Rd for 1.4 miles to the boat ramp on Lookout Point Lake. From the aerial photographs the boat launch is only usable at full Pool.

Signal Point Day Use Area is a no fee boat Launch operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Lookout Point Lake at 541-937-2131. Exit 188 A or B. east on State Hwy 58 for Approximately 12.9. miles. Turn left at Turn left onto Jasper Lowell Rd, which becomes Pioneer St. for .7 miles.urn left to stay on Jasper Lowell Rd / North Shore Dr. for .7 miles. Turn right onto E Main St. for 400 feet. Turn right onto North Shore Ln / W Boundary Rd for 1.4 miles to the boat ramp on Lookout Point Lake.

Lookout Point recreation

Day-use parks: Lookout Point Reservoir has one day-use park and one day-use boat ramp operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Both areas have no associated fees but have varying operating time frames. Meridian Park is on the north side of the dam on West Boundary Road. It includes a gravel road and parking area, a vault toilet, picnic tables and a boat ramp with a courtesy dock but ramp access is limited by seasonal water levels. The park is open daily from 8 a.m. until dusk, May 11 - Sept. 9. Signal Point Boat Ramp is on West Boundary Road, 4.9 miles upstream from the dam and 6.3 miles from Lowell. It includes a paved parking lot, a vault toilet and low-water-level paved boat ramp with courtesy dock. For more information about either facility, call the Willamette Valley Project Park Ranger Office at 541-942-5631.

Camping: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates Ivan Oakes Campground at Lookout Point Reservoir. For more information, call the Willamette Valley Project Park Ranger Office at 541-942-5631.

Ivan Oakes Campground: Open May 25 - Sept. 3. Fees: $14 per night, per site; $6 per day, per extra vehicle. Availability: first-come, first-served.

Landax Park: location is referenced on the Army Corp of Engineer's map but no information was referenced on the internet. Research needed.

Hampton Campground is located approximately 9 miles west of Oakridge at an elevation of 1,000 feet. This campground has 4 sites with potable water and toilets available.  

Black Canyon Campground

With 75 campsites and located in a mature Douglas-fir and Western Red Cedar forest, this campground offers a cool respite from summer heat alongside the Middle Fork of the Willamette River.  The campground offers some riverside sites with pleasant shade, fresh air with cool breezes. Each site contains a picnic table and campfire ring with grill. Accessible vault toilets and drinking water are provided. Located close to the city of Oakridge, the camp is directly off of Oregon State Highway 58. 

A 1-mile interpretive nature trail winds through the campground, and Lookout Point Lake is less than a mile away, with opportunities for boating and fishing. A boat ramp is located on the lake. 

Black Canyon is within the Winberry Trail Area, with excellent terrain like the Tire Mountain Trail for mountain biking and horseback riding, and the Clover Patch Trail for hiking.

Directions: Eight miles west of Oakridge, Oregon. From Oakridge, Oregon: From the junction of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 (the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge), travel west on 58 for approximately eight miles. The destination will be on your right.

Middle Fork Ranger District is the southern part of the forest, bordering the Deschutes and Umpqua National Forests. Accessible from the west on Highway 58 from Eugene, OR, or from the south via Highway 58.

Spend some time exploring Waldo Lake, one of the gems of the forest, but don’t forget to get out on some of the great mountain biking, hiking, and horse trails in this area.

Hiking

Backpacking and day hikes can be found all over the district including, Fall Creek Trail Area, and Hardesty Trail Area. For spectacular mountain scenery, try a hike in the Willamette Pass Trail Area

Other Recreation:

The renowned Middle Fork Willamette National Recreation Trail #3609.

Designated a National Recreation Trail in 2007, This beautiful, multi-use trail offers over 30 miles of adventure along the Middle Fork of the Willamette River. The trail starts near Timponogas Campground and finishes near Sand Prairie Campground. Multiple trailheads offer opportunities for shorter trips and several of the easily accessible riverside areas receive high use.

There are opportunities to view wildlife, flowers, waterfalls, and portions of the historic Oregon Central Military Wagon Road as you travel through forests of mixed conifer, cottonwood, and big leaf maple - giving the visitor diverse views of changing ecosystems.

With a moderately strenuous grade and nearly 95% singletrack, the trail is popular with mountain bikers, but several sections of the trail are flat and can provide a scenic walk for even the youngest family member. Bring a fishing pole and a picnic and make it a day!

The lower sections of this trail can be open year round, while the upper sections may be under snow into June.

Close to:

  • Secret Campground: is approximately 20 miles south of Oakridge, Oregon, on the Middle Fork of the Willamette River.
  • From Oakridge, Oregon: Beginning at the junction of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light along Highway 58), travel east along 58 for 1.7 miles.  At the junction of Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road, turn right. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21.  Travel along Forest Road 21 for approximately 18 miles and the destination will be on your right.

  • Campers Flat Campground is located 22.2 miles south of Oakridge, Oregon, along the Middle Fork of the Willamette River.
  • From Oakridge,Oregon: From the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge, proceed east on Oregon State Highway 58 for 1.7 miles. Turn right on Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21.  Follow Forest Road 21 for 20 miles, and the destination will be on your right. 

  • Sacandaga Campground is l located 27 miles southeast of Oakridge, Oregon, on the Middle Fork of the Willamette River.
  • From Oakridge, Oregon: From the junction of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light along Highway 58 in Oakridge), proceed east on Highway 58 for 1.7 miles.  Turn right onto Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21.  Follow Forest Road 21 for 24.6 miles and the destination will be on your right.

  • Indigo Springs Campground is approximately 31 miles southeast of Oakridge, Oregon.
  • From the junction of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 in Oakridge (the only traffic light in Oakridge on Highway 58), travel east on 58 approximately two miles until Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road.  Turn right and travel 0.5 miles until Forest Road 21. Turn right on Forest Road 21 and travel south for approximately 28.5 miles, and the destination will be on your left. 

  • Timpanogas Campground is approximately 42 miles southeast of Oakridge, Oregon, in the Oregon Cascades Recreation Area (Douglas County)
  • From Oakridge, Oregon: From the intersection of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light along Highway 58 in Oakridge), proceed east on Highway 58 for 1.7 miles.  Turn right onto HIlls Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21. Travel for approximately 32 miles (past Indigo Springs Campground) until the junction with Forest Road 2154. Turn left onto Forest Road 2154 and travel approximately 8 miles (past the end of pavement) to the campground. 

  • Sand Prairie Campground is 14 miles south of Oakridge, Oregon, on the Middle Fork of the Willamette River.
  • From Oakridge, Oregon: At the intersection of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light along Highway 58 in Oakridge), head east on Highway 58 for 1.7 miles to Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road.  Turn right on Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road and travel for 0.5 miles to Forest Road 21.  Turn right onto 21, and travel for approximately 11.6 miles and the destination will be on your right.

Directions:

Access is from several trailheads along Forest Road 21 starting at Sand Prairie Campground and ending at Timpanagos Campground:

  • Sand Prairie Campground Trailhead: from Oakridge, Oregon, travel east on Highway 58 for 2 miles to Kitson Springs County Road. Turn right and proceed on Kitson Springs County Road for 0.5 miles to Forest Road 21. Turn right and follow Forest Road 21 for 11 miles to Sand Prairie Campground to access the trailhead. Continue along Forest Road 21 for access to several more trailheads (identified by hiker symbol signs).
  • Forest Road 2120 Trailhead: from Oakridge, Oregon, travel east on Highway 58 for 2 miles to Kitson Springs County Road. Turn right and proceed on Kitson Springs County Road for 0.5 mile to Forest Road 21. Turn right and follow Forest Road 21 for 11 miles to Sand Prairie Campground to access the first trailhead. Continue along Forest Road 21 for access to several more trailheads (identified by hiker symbol signs). These access points are:
  • Forest Road 2127 Trailhead: from Oakridge, Oregon, travel east on Highway 58 for 2 miles to Kitson Springs County Road. Turn right and proceed on Kitson Springs County Road for 0.5 mile to Forest Road 21. Turn right and follow Forest Road 21 for 11 miles to Sand Prairie Campground to access the first trailhead. Continue along Forest Road 21 for access to several more trailheads (identified by hiker symbol signs). These access points are:
  • Forest Road 2133/2134 Trailhead from Oakridge, Oregon, travel east on Highway 58 for 2 miles to Kitson Springs County Road. Turn right and proceed on Kitson Springs County Road for 0.5 mile to Forest Road 21. Turn right and follow Forest Road 21 for 11 miles to Sand Prairie Campground to access the first trailhead. Continue along Forest Road 21 for access to several more trailheads (identified by hiker symbol signs). These access points are:
  • Forest Road 2143 Trailhead from Oakridge, Oregon, travel east on Highway 58 for 2 miles to Kitson Springs County Road. Turn right and proceed on Kitson Springs County Road for 0.5 mile to Forest Road 21. Turn right and follow Forest Road 21 for 11 miles to Sand Prairie Campground to access the first trailhead. Continue along Forest Road 21 for access to several more trailheads (identified by hiker symbol signs). These access points are:
  • Indigo Springs Campground Trailhead approximately 31 miles southeast of Oakridge, Oregon. From the junction of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 in Oakridge (the only traffic light in Oakridge on Highway 58), travel east on 58 approximately two miles until Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road.  Turn right and travel 0.5 miles until Forest Road 21. Turn right on Forest Road 21 and travel south for approximately 28.5 miles, and the destination will be on your left. 
  • Forest Road 2153 Trailhead from Oakridge, Oregon, travel east on Highway 58 for 2 miles to Kitson Springs County Road. Turn right and proceed on Kitson Springs County Road for 0.5 mile to Forest Road 21. Turn right and follow Forest Road 21 for 11 miles to Sand Prairie Campground to access the first trailhead. Continue along Forest Road 21 for access to several more trailheads (identified by hiker symbol signs). These access points are:
  • Indigo/June Lakes Trailhead at Timpanogas Campground is approximately 42 miles southeast of Oakridge, Oregon, in the Oregon Cascades Recreation Area (Douglas County) From Oakridge, Oregon: From the intersection of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light along Highway 58 in Oakridge), proceed east on Highway 58 for 1.7 miles.  Turn right onto HIlls Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21. Travel for approximately 32 miles (past Indigo Springs Campground) until the junction with Forest Road 2154. Turn left onto Forest Road 2154 and travel approximately 8 miles (past the end of pavement) to the campground. 

The Dead Moutain Trail

Details

  • This trail is very popular with mountain bikers but is shared between hikers, horses, mountain bikes and motorcycles.
  • Poison oak can be found along the trail in the open, grassy areas. 

Length: 6.3 miles (10.1 km)

Elevation: 2,390 feet elevation gain - trail begins at 1,330 feet and ends at 3,720 feet

Difficulty: More Difficult

The Alpine Trail and Dead Mountain Trail are just two of the more popular mountain biking areas. The 9 mile Alpine Trail starts at 3,200 ft. elevation and ends at 4,784. It is open to hikers, mountain bikers, and horses.

Details

  • Length: 9.3 miles (14.9 km)
  • Elevation: 1,584 feet elevation gain. Trail begins at 3,200 feet and ends at 4,784 feet
  • Recommended Season: Spring (lower elevation segment), summer and fall
  • Difficulty: Moderate to difficult
  • Uses: Hikers, horses, mountain bikes
  • Map Location: T.19, 20, 21 S., R.2, 3 E., W.M.

Close to:

  • Buckhead Trail from Oakridge, OR, travel 4 miles west, turn right onto Westfir Road (Highway 58 Milepost 31.5). This road junction is located just north of the Middle Fork Ranger District office. Turn left after crossing the green bridge over the Middle Fork Willamette River. Travel 1 mile toward Westfir. Turn left at the community of Hemlock junction, cross the bridge, turn left and proceed 2.2 miles to the trailhead parking lot which is located on the left side of the road. This is Forest Road 5821 and it provides an alternate route to Lowell, OR.
  • North Fork Segment 1 Trail turn onto Westfir Road (Highway 58 Milepost 31.5). This road junction is located immediately north of the Middle Fork Ranger District office. Turn left after crossing the green bridge over the Middle Fork Willamette River. Travel to Westfir and make a left turn at the stop sign and cross the covered bridge (Office Bridge). The trailhead is located on the right. 
  • An alternate route is to continue on through Westfir on Forest Road 19 to Forest Road 1912. Turn left and cross the bridge. The trailhead is found on the left at the fork in the road.

  • Saddleblanket Trail from Lowell, OR, travel 2 miles north on the Jasper-Lowell Road, turn right at the Unity Bridge and proceed 16.2 miles on Big Fall Creek Road (Forest Road 18).
  • Turn right on to Forest Road 1824 and travel 7.7 miles. Keep left at Forest Road 142 and proceed 1.1 miles to Forest Road 144. Turn right and travel 0.8 mile to the end of the road. The trail begins on the left side of the road.

    The other end of the trail is reached by traveling on Forest Road 1824-142 for 2.9 miles to Forest Road 143 and going 0.9 mile to the trailhead. Forest Road 143 is closed to motor vehicle traffic in the spring for wildlife management. 

One of the gems of the Willamette National Forest is the Waldo Lake Area provides many recreational opportunities including horse camping, non-motorized boating, swimming, hiking and biking.

For those who prefer to travel by horse, the spectacular Diamond Peak Trail Area offers multiple trails For those that enjoy travel of the motorized type, OHV enthusiasts can enjoy the Huckleberry Flats OHV Trail.

Fall Creek National Recreation Trail #3455

The Fall Creek Trail is designated as a National Recreation Trail. As a Hiker Only route, it follows Fall Creek for most of the route, allowing the hiker to enjoy the cool valley air and observing the mix of riparian (streamside) vegetation.

Fall Creek Trailhead #1 is located approximately 10.2 miles northeast of Lowell, Oregon: beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. Turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam, bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. The destination will be on the left after crossing the bridge over Fall Creek.

Dolly Varden Campground is located approximately 10.3 miles northeast of Lowell, Oregon: beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. Turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam, bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. destination will be on your left after crossing the bridge over Fall Creek.

Broken Bowl Campground is located 10.8 miles northeast of Lowell, Oregon: beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. destination will be on your right between the NF-18 and Fall Creek.

Big Pool Campground is located 11.5 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon: beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on your right between the NF-18 and Fall Creek.

Clark Creek Nature Trailhead is located 12.6 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on th left side of the road. There is a very good parking and turn around area on the left side of the road just past the entrance to the Clark Creek Organization Camp.

Fall Creek Trailhead #2 is located 13.1 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on the right side of the road.

Bedrock Campground is located in a dynamic landscape setting shaped by fire, this 22 site camground is situated on a terrace above Fall Creek where the hillsides surrounding the camp offer an impressive fireweed bloom display during the summer months. Expect heavy use on summer weekends from visitors escaping high temperatures in nearby urban areas. The Bedrock Campground is is located 14.4 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on the left side of the road.

Fall Creek Trailhead #3 The third trailhead is located at the northwest corner of the Bedrock Campground.

Bedrock Day Use Area is located 14.5 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on the right side of the road.

Puma Campground is located 16.1 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on the left side of the road.

Fall Creek Trailhead #4 is located 18.0 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on the left side of the road at NF-1828.

Fall Creek Trailhead #5 is located 20.4 miles east of Lowell. From Lowell, Oregon beginning at the Jasper-Lowell Rd. turn right onto Big Fall Creek Rd. until approaching the base of the Fall Creek Lake dam. Bear to the left after passing Winberry Creek Road (on your right). Note that Big Fall Creek Road becomes Forest Road 18 after crossing the National Forest boundary. Your destination will be on the right on NF-1833.

Close to:

Blair Lake Campground is approximately 18 miles northeast of Oakridge, Oregon. See website for travel details.

Close to:

Wall Creek Day Use Warm Springs - From the intersection of Crestview Street and State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge) proceed north to 1St. Turn right onto E. 1 St. Travel east on E. 1 St. beyond the point where E. 1 St changes its name to Salmon Creek Rd. Travel east on Salmon Creek Rd. to FS-1934 a total distance of approximately 8.6 miles. Turn left onto 1934. Travel for .5 miles to the trailhead parking area on the left. Follow the trail .3 miles to the hot springs

Blue Pool Campground (Middle Fork Ranger District): this 24-site campground is conveniently located adjacent to Oregon State Highway 58 in an old growth forest alongside Salt Creek.

Fishing and swimming are popular activities. A large picnic area along the creek offers picnic tables, a large grassy area for both passive and active recreation. One-half mile east of the campground on Highway 58 is the McCredie Day Use Area & Hot Springs. The site was formally developed as a hot springs resort historically; currently the hot springs area is unimproved. Caution should be exercised when using the hot springs, water temperature is very high in the pools. Directions: from Oakridge, Oregon: From the intersection of Crestview Street and State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge) proceed east on Oregon State Highway 58 for 9.2 miles to the entrance to the Blue Pool Campground and 9.7 to the entrance to McCredie Day Use area. Both destinations will be on your right.

Hills Creek Reservoir Area area description

Hills Creek Reservoir is located 45 miles southeast of Eugene, on the Middle Fork Willamette River, four miles southwest of Oakridge, Oregon.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built Hills Creek Reservoir in 1961. The dam was built to provide flood control, irrigation, power generation, water-based recreation and improved down stream navigation. The 44-mile shoreline of this reservoir is managed to provide habitat for a wide variety of wildlife and waterfowl.

The scenic 2,735 acre lake (when full) with its 44 miles of forested shoreline provide many recreation opportunities including camping, boating, swimming, fishing, and water skiing.

Campers Flat Campground is Located 22.2 miles south of Oakridge, Oregon, along the Middle Fork of the Willamette River. From the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge, proceed east on Oregon State Highway 58 for 1.7 miles. Turn right on Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21. Follow Forest Road 21 for 20 miles, and the destination will be on your right. 

Packard Creek Campground is a fee use facility managed by the U.S. Forest Service at 541-782-2283. From the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge, proceed east on Oregon State Highway 58 for 1.7 miles. Turn right on Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21. Follow Forest Road 21 for 5.3 miles, and the destination will be on your left. 

Packard Creek Campground area description

Packard Creek is a popular 37-site campground on the western side of Hills Creek Reservoir. The family-friendly destination offers a picturesque setting among tall trees, with views of the lake beyond. Most of the campground is accessible. Each campsite is equipped with a picnic table and a campfire ring. The group campground, which can accommodate up to 80 people, has a large picnic shelter and open space for tents. Some sites have individual boat docks as well. The campground is busy on summer weekends, so plan your arrival accordingly.

Popular recreational activities are swimming, boating, and fishing. Accessible parking is offered at the boat ramp/swimming area. Hikers, equestrians, and mountain bikers can explore the nearby Larison Creek Trail.

Be aware that there is an abundant supply of poison oak throughout the camp; use caution when walking off the paved roads.

Hills Creek Reservoir: SNW - Bingham boat ramp is managed by the U.S. Forest Service at 541-782-2283. From the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge, proceed east on Oregon State Highway 58 for 1.7 miles. Turn right on Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Forest Road 21. Follow Forest Road 21 for 10.6 miles, and the destination will be on your left at NF-2118.

Hills Creek Lake C.T. Beach Picnic Area is use fee area of Hills Creek Lake managed by the U.S. Forest Service at 541-782-2283. The Hills Creek Lake C.T. Beach Picnic Area is Located southeast of Oakridge, Oregon, along the Middle Fork of the Willamette River. From the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge, proceed east on Oregon State Highway 58 for 1.7 miles. Turn right on Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 3.7 miles turn into the entrance to the boat ramp. From the photo it appears that the boat ramp is only useable during maximum pool.

Kitson Bathhouse Hot Springs are located off of Hills Creek Lake. From the only traffic light on Highway 58 in Oakridge, proceed east on Oregon State Highway 58 for 1.7 miles. Turn right on Hills Creek Road/Kitson Springs Road. Travel for 4.4 miles. turn left and your there

Salmon Creek Falls Campground

This 14 site campground is located in a beautiful, lush, old growth forest along Salmon Creek. The rocky gorge-like area creates two small beautiful waterfalls and several deep pools which reflect the clear blue-green waters. Wild thimbleberries and hazelnuts abound in the summer. This camp is a favorite recreation spot for local residents as well as some more distant travelers.

Five miles east of Oakridge, Oregon, along Salmon Creek.

From the corner of Crestview Street and Oregon State Highway 58 (at the only traffic light along Highway 58 in Oakridge), travel north on Crestview Street over the railroad tracks for 0.2 miles.  Bear right at the four-way intersection onto East 1st Street, through the center of Oakridge.  Follow East 1st Street for approximately 1.1 miles out of town to the junction of Fish Hatchery Road (on your right).  Here, East 1st becomes Forest Road 24, otherwise known as the Salmon Creek Road.  Stay straight on Salmon Creek Road, and travel approximately 3.7 miles and the destination will be on your right.

Salmon Creek Falls Day Use Area

Gold Lake Area

Gold Lake, situated in an open alpine forest, is a popular spot in both summer and winter. Although motors are not allowed on this small (100 acre, 25 feet deep) lake, canoes, rafts and rowboats provide excellent fishing access. A primitive log shelter built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the early 1940s provides a dry picnic area or overnight protection for cross country skiers in winter.

Located very near the lake is Gold Lake Bog. This special area offers the visitor the opportunity to view deer, elk, and other smaller wildlife.

In the late spring and summer this area abounds with wild flowers and huckleberries. This is a popular area to pick huckleberries in the late summer.

View more Popular Lakes & Rivers

Gold Lake Campground: this 21 site campground is situated near the Cascade crest with some sites adjacent to the picturesque Gold Lake. Visitors come for the alpine forest setting, quiet, autumn huckleberries, and wildlife viewing. The adjacent Gold Lake bog is ideal for viewing deer, elk, and beaver.

Motors are prohibited on the small lake (100 acres in size and 25 feet deep), but non-motorized craft are permitted, such as canoes and float tubes. The lake is fly-fishing only; please consult the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations for the most up-to-date information.

A historic "Willamette Winged" log shelter exists in the day use area, and provides an overnight place for cross-country skiers during the winter, and a day-use facility during summer. The shelter was designed by William Parke, the Willamette National Forest's first Recreation Planner, and constructed with Civilian Conservation Corps labor during the early 1940s. Parke was a 1932 graduate of the Oregon State College of Forestry, and was training as a Landscape Architect at the University of Oregon when hired by the Forest Service.

View more Popular Lakes & Rivers

Indigo Springs Campground

Kiahanie Campground

Puma Campground

Sacandaga Campground

Sand Prairie Campground

Secret Campground

Skookum Creek Campground

Timpanogas Campground

Waldo Lake Area area description

Thick forests, hiking, mountain biking, camping, swimming and boating. Waldo Lake is a recreation gem of the Cascades (besides the hordes of mosquitoes in early summer). Waldo Lake is one of the largest natural lakes in Oregon. Lying high on the western slopes of the Oregon Cascades, Waldo Lake is one of the largest natural lakes in Oregon and one of the purest lakes in the world. It has no permanent inlet to bring nutrients into the lake for plant growth. The lack of plant life contributes to its purity. You can see to depths of 120 feet on a calm day. It offers a uniquely peaceful setting on the water and along remote shorelines, surrounded by forests of Douglas fir and Western Hemlock. Recreation in the area is abundant with the lake an ideal location for water activities like sailing, canoeing and swimming. See more photos.

CAMPING

Waldo Lake’s three developed campgrounds usually open in late June or early July, depending on snowpack. North Waldo, Islet, and Shadow Bay have over 200 developed sites with toilets, potable water and boat ramps at Waldo Lake. Many campsites can be reserved up to six months in advance of arrival through recreation.gov. Campgrounds are often full mid-August into September.

Waldo also has nearly 50 primitive dispersed campsites around the lake. Dispersed campsites are free, but there are rules for staying in a dispersed site, including how to dispose properly of waste (there are no restroom facilities at these sites).

BOATING

Waldo Lake is one of the clearest lakes in Oregon and to help maintain the purity, only electric boats motors traveling less than 10 mph. Non motorized boats such as canoes, kayaks and paddle boards are popular along with the occasional sailboat. Boaters may debark at Waldo’s two islands for a picnic or scampering around, but may not camp there overnight.

Boating Regulations & Boating Safety: Oregon State Marine Board manages boating regulations. Visit their website for boating regulations and safety information. They also have links to information about water levels.

HIKING/BIKING

Waldo Lake borders the Waldo Lake Wilderness area. There are numerous trails that lead to nearby wilderness lakes.

Mountain bikers may use any trail marked for the sport. The 20-mile Waldo Lake Trail (also known as the Jim Weaver Loop trail) around the lake is a popular ride. But at 5,400 feet in elevation the trail is covered with snow late into the season. Early fall when the trail dries out and the mosquitoes die down it’s a great ride.

FACTS & FIGURES

Lake Area: 6,298 acres (9.8 square miles)

Lake Surface Elevation: 5,414 feet

Maximum Depth: 420 feet

Average depth: 128 feet

Length of shoreline: 21.7 miles

Basin Formation: Tectonic fault block subsidence modified by glaciers

Soils: Thin layer (average between 3 and 6 feet) of moderately weathered volcanic ash and boulders from glacial outwash over basaltic bedrock

History of the Waldo Lake Area

Islet Campground (Waldo Lake) area description

This 55 site campground is located at the north end of Waldo Lake, just south of North Waldo Campground. Each site has a fire ring and table. There are three vault restrooms within the campground and another at the boat launch/day use area. There is a sanitation station within easy access. Islet offers wonderful sandy beaches. Western winds consistently blow each afternoon, offering respite from early season mosquitoes, which are typically intense from June to mid-August so come prepared.

Waldo Lake is one of the largest natural lakes in Oregon. It offers a uniquely peaceful setting on the water and along remote shorelines, surrounded by forests of Douglas fir and western hemlock. Recreation in the area is abundant with the lake an ideal location for water activities like sailing, canoeing and swimming.

The north end of Waldo Lake is a popular starting point for many wilderness trails and lakes, most notably the Rigdon, Wahanna and Torrey Lakes. There is a 1-mile Shoreline Trail between Islet and North Waldo campgrounds which provides a short and pleasant hike along the lakeshore.

North Waldo Campground area description

North Waldo is the most popular of the Waldo Lake campgrounds. There are 58 sites with fire rings and tables. There is a sanitation station near the campground. The drier environment supports fewer mosquitoes, but they are still plentiful in season so come prepared. The boat launch is somewhat deeper than the others on the lake, which is more accommodating for sailboats.

Waldo Lake is one of the largest natural lakes in Oregon. It offers a uniquely peaceful setting on the water and along remote shorelines, surrounded by forests of Douglas fir and Western Hemlock. Recreation in the area is abundant with the lake an ideal location for water activities like sailing, canoeing and swimming.

North Waldo is a popular starting point for many wilderness trails and lakes, most notably the Rigdon Lakes Trail, Wahanna Trail and the Whig & Torrey Way Trail. The 1-mile Shoreline Trail between North Waldo and Islet provides a short and pleasant hike along the lakeshore.

Shadow Bay Campground (Waldo Lake) area description

This 47-site campground is less busy than its neighboring campground, North Waldo, resulting in a quieter atmosphere. It is situated in a lower and wetter landscape than North Waldo and Islet Campground and supports thicker and more diverse groundcover and generally more mosquitoes earlier in the season, so come prepared June to mid-August. Garbage containers and gray water disposal areas are available at the campground.

There are three areas of the campground that can be reserved as group sites.

Group Site B can accommodate 120 people and 19 vehicles.

Group Site C can accommodate 120 people and 17 vehicles.

Group Site E can accommodate 30 people and 5 vehicles.

Hikers, equestrians, and mountain bikers can traverse the Shoreline Trai to the historic South Waldo Shelter and then continue on the Jim Weaver Loop #3590. Winding around to the west side of the lake, the public can catch glimpses of the lake through the high-elevation forest, or capture broad views of the High Cascades mountains from open viewpoints.

Odell Lake: The primary activity is fishing for kokanee, but the lake also has mackinaw and rainbow trout; in 1974 a mackinaw weighing 35 pounds was taken. Kokanee are naturally spawning, but are also stocked (150,000 annually). Boating, swimming, and camping are other important activities.

Princess Creek Campground is a no use fee boat launch operated by the U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-383-4000 for addtional information. DIRECTIONS: In Crescent, OR, at intersection of of US Rt. 97 and Crescent Cut-off Rd., take Crescent Cut-off Rd. west 11.8 miles to a "T" intersection. Turn right and go 9 miles to campground on left.

Sunset Cove Campground is a no use fee boat launch operated by the U.S. Forest ServiceContact 541-383-4000 for addtional information. DIRECTIONS: In Crescent, OR, at intersection of US Rt. 97 and Crescent Cut- off Rd., take Crescent Cut-off Rd. west 11.8 miles to a "T" intersection. Turn right and go 6.2 miles to campground on left.

Odell Lake Resort is a no use fee boat launch operated by the resort. Contact 541-433-2540 for addtional information.

Shelter Cove Resort is a no use fee boat ramp operated by the resort . Contact 0541-433-2548 for additional information.

Trapper Creek Campground is a no use fee boat launch operated by the U.S. Forest ServiceContact 541-383-4000 for addtional information. Directions: In Crescent, OR, at intersection of of US Rt. 97 and Crescent Cut-off Rd., take Crescent Cut-off Rd. west 11.8 miles to a "T" intersection. Turn right and go 10.3 miles to Odell Lake sign. Turn left at sign onto Forest Rt. 5810 and go 1.8 miles to campground on left.

Return to Map 1 of the Oregon Coast Trail.